4th Energy Forum (2009)
Budapest 15-17 November 2009

4th  ENERGY FORUM
Budapest, 15-17 November 2009

 

Possibilities of the regional co-operation in the CEE Region in the new political-economic realities

 

The room for manoeuvre of the Central Eastern European countries in cooperating in the field of energy is constrained by several outside factors. While the gas crisis of January 2009 created unprecedented incentives for cooperation, the impact of the new economic realities – lower energy prices and low economic growth – for the chances of cooperation is yet uncertain.

In terms of CEE’s political environment, the year of 2009 is a transition period. It is yet to be seen what will be the priorities of the new European Commission to be set up in November 2009. By then, the new U.S. administration’s commitment to renewable energy and climate change, and its ability and willingness to be present in Central Eastern Europe in the terms of energy will be seen. At the same time, Russia’s ability to act in the field of energy in the region will be hindered by the financial crisis and the lower energy prices.
 
The 4th Energy Forum aims to create some certainty amid the uncertain environment by sketching possible future developments in energy globally, in the European Union and in the Central Eastern European region and identifying options for Central Eastern European political and business decision makers to influence energy developments through positive impact of cooperation.

 

Draft Programme:

November 15    Arrival of the participants / registration

18:00 – 19:30  Report Presentation

“The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future”, September 2009
Report by Risø – National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark

Presented by: Hans Larsen, Director of Systems Analysis Division,  Risø – National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark
     Today’s energy system is the result of decisions taken over more than a century, developed according to basic engineering requirements: energy is produced to meet the needs of consumers. A new supply structure based on variable energy resources such as wind power will require a much more flexible energy system, also including the flexibility of the energy consumers. Long-term targets for renewable energy deployment and stable energy policies are needed in order to reduce uncertainty for investors. A mix of distributed energy resources is needed to allow system balancing and provide flexibility in the electricity system. Electric vehicles, electric heating, heat pumps and small-scale distributed generation, such as fuel-cell-based microCHP, are promising options.

Reception

November 16 (Monday)

8.45 Opening remarks:

Zygmunt Berdychowski, Chairman of the Economic Forum Program Council, Poland
Janos Csak, Chairman of the Executive Board, Constellation Energy Institute, Hungary

9:00 – 10:30
I Plenary session:
Energy as a Factor of Prosperity and Sovereignty

10:30 – 10:45 coffee break

II.  Panel discussions
10:45 – 12:15

1. Impact of the Financial Crisis on the Energy Sector
     The financial crisis has dealt a double blow to CEE economies. First, the amount of liquid capital available in the Western world has dropped dramatically. Commercial banks have started a deleveraging process, i.e. shrinking of their total assets, which is likely to last for a long time. Consequently, there will be less capital available for the CEE region, as well. Second, the crisis exposed the region’s vulnerabilities and showed it to be more risky than previously assumed. As a result, the inflow of foreign funds, which served as the basis of the region’s export-led growth model, dropped drastically, and it will not reach its pre-crisis levels any time soon.
This made funding, which was previously a non-issue, a key obstacle to energy investments. In fact, it is hard to see how the region could attract enough capital to finance its major energy projects. The panel addresses the issue of how the financial crisis affected and will affect investments planned in the energy sector in CEE.

10:45 – 12:15 in parallel
2. Towards Secure Energy Supply – Politics or Business?

12:15 – 12:30 coffee break

12:30 – 14:00
3. Skeletons in the Cupboard: Lessons Learned from the January 2009 Gas Crisis
     While there was a lot of talk about the political side and implications of the January 2009 crisis, very little public discussion was devoted to the technological aspect. How did the January gas crisis affect the European gas market, the Baumgarten hub and the gas transmission networks? The panel aims at uncovering some light on the above issues.

12:30 – 14:00 in parallel
4. Growth through Innovation. Energy and New Technologies

14:00 – 15:00 LUNCH

15:00 – 16:30
5. The EU and the US in the Run-Up to the conference in Copenhagen

15:00 – 16:30 in parallel
6. On the Way to European Energy Security: What to Expect from the European Union?

16:30 – 16:45 coffee break

16:45 – 18:15
7. The Role of Foreign Investment – How to Attract Energy Investments in CEE?
     All of the countries of Central Eastern Europe are considering major investments in their energy sectors in the next years: pipelines, LNG terminals, nuclear reactors, interconnectors and so on. Additionally, there are some privatizations coming up most particularly in South Eastern Europe. The project addresses the issue of how countries of the region could attract foreign investment in their energy industry in the new financial and economic realities? Is this the time for major FDI in the energy sector in CEE? What incentives countries should create to attract foreign investment? What obstacles foreign companies face?

16:45 – 18:15 in parallel
8. Russian Energy Strategy and the New Economic Realities
     The financial crisis hit Russia much more than expected. How did the crisis affect major Russian energy companies and planned investments? Will Nord Stream and South Stream go ahead? Do Russian energy companies have enough capital to invest in the Central European energy industry? How long it will take for Russia to recover from the crisis?

18: 25 – 18: 55
Global Gas Report – presented by Thierry Bros, Senior Analyst, Utilities, Société Générale Cross Asset Research, France

III. 20:00-22:00 Dinner held in the Hungarian Parliament

November 17 (Tuesday)

9:00 – 10:30
I. Plenary session:
Common EU Energy Policy: Is it Really a Must ?

II. Panel discussions
10:45 – 12:15

9. Financing of the Energy Sector in CEE: Are There Financial Resources Available?
     In light of the impact of the financial crisis on CEE, this panel addresses the question where financing can come from. The different options are: government, European Union, World Bank, EBRD, or own initiatives of CEE countries. Some of them will be presented at the panel.

10:45 – 12:15 in parallel
10. Regional Strategic Energy Projects
     This panel covers the most important regional strategic energy projects like Nabucco, TGI, NETS and provides a status report about them. The panel also addresses the issue of obstacles and challenges for cooperation in the field of energy in Central Eastern Europe. It is also a venue for testing new grounds and ideas for potential cooperation in the region to enhance the region’s energy security in general.

12:30 – 14:00
11. Challenges for the Nuclear Energy Development

12:30 – 14:00 in parallel
12. The Role of Alternative Sources in the Energy Mix – What future for Green Energy in the new Economic Realities?

14:00 – 14:15 Closing remarks

14:15 – 15:30 LUNCH 

Participants: over 200 delegates from the UE, the CEE region, Russia, Central Asia and the USA: politicians, experts, businessmen, journalists

Conference venue: Duna-Palace, Address: 1051 Budapest, Zrínyi u. 5.
www.dunapalota.hu/index.php?fej1=01&fej2=02&oldal=teremlista

Accommodation: Budapest Marriott Hotel ***** Address: Apáczai Csere János utca 4.
www.marriott.com/hotels/hotel-photos/budhu-budapest-marriott-hotel/

Website: www.budapestenergyforum.eu

 

Organized by:

 

 

           

 

 

 

Donors:

                

ENERGA GROUP's activities include the production, turnover, distribution and transfer of electric energy. ENERGA holds a coal power plant, 2 electricity and heating power plants, a complete network of customer service offices and 162 000 km of power lines. The water energy plants and wind farms owned by ENERGA provide almost 30% of the Polish market's input in renewable resources production. The strategy for 2009-15 plans investments in production resources, improvements in the distribution network and in customer service.

http://www.energa.pl/

Polish Power Exchange (PolPX) is the sole licensed commodity exchange in Poland. Its operational activity started in 2000. Nowadays PolPX runs markets where major power sector players transact. These are: Day-Ahead Market, Power Derivatives Market, Financial Derivatives Market, Certificates Market, and Emission Allowances (EUA) Market. PolPX runs also Register of Certificates of Origin and organizes transactions’ settlements made by its Members in particular markets and during OTC transactions.

 

 

Chief Institutional Partners:
 

               

 

Institutional Partners:
 

Embassy of Poland

Embassy of Denmark

Embassy of the United States of America

 

Foreign Affairs Committee of the Hungarian Parliament

 

 

 

Main Media Partners:
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Partners:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Risø Energy Report

The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future

Risø Energy Report 8
Edited by Hans Larsen and Leif Sønderberg Petersen
Risø DTU, September 2009, ISBN 978-87-550-3755-7, 72 p

 

This report is volume 8 in a series started in 2002, and will take its point of reference in the need for the development of a highly flexible and intelligent energy system infrastructure which facilitates substantial higher amounts of renewable energy than today's energy systems. This intelligent and flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite in achieving the goals set up by IPCC in 2007 on CO2 reductions as well as ensuring the future security of energy supply in all regions of the world.

The report presents a generic approach for future infrastructure issues on local, regional and global scale with focus on the energy system.

The report is based on chapters and updates from Risø Energy Report 1 – 7, as well as input from contributors to the DTU Climate Change Technology workshops and available international literature and reports.

 

 

Abstract

Today's energy system is the result of decisions taken over more than a century, developed according to basic engineering requirements: energy is produced to meet the needs of consumers. A new supply structure based on variable energy resources such as wind power will require a much more flexible energy system, also including the flexibility of the energy consumers. Long-term targets for renewable energy deployment and stable energy policies are needed in order to reduce uncertainty for investors. A mix of distributed energy resources is needed to allow system balancing and provide flexibility in the electricity system. Electric vehicles, electric heating, heat pumps and small-scale distributed generation, such as fuel-cell-based microCHP, are promising options.

 

 

 

 

Presentation of the RISØ  Energy Report

Budapest, 15 November 2009

Prezentacja raportu Risø/ Risø raport presentation

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